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Hello!
Could someone help me?I think at 28 meters the ground to the center of mato is 27cm and has the diameter of 36 cm.
I would like to know how high from the ground to center should I hang a mato at half distance (14 meters)? how about 7 meters?
Is the target's diameter smaller as well at 14 meters? At 7 meters?

thank you!
 
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I've got a bamboo yumi from Yumi-Bows (their web site is down at the moment). I've had it for a couple of years, but only just started using it again regularly. However it is warping. I think it is from the humidity, because I'm using it at an outdoor range in eastern Pennsylvania in the summer. Given that I'm planning on practicing a lot, I thought I should get a yumi made from either fiberglass or carbon fiber.

Can anybody give me a rundown on the differences between yumi made from fiberglass and from carbon fiber? As to how they would affect my use.
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Hello, I'm a Malaysian studying in Japan. I just started taking kyudo classes in my university so I am really, a beginner. I hope anybody can give me tips on how to improve my aim. You see, my arrows tend to go to the right of where I target. My class is now using the Mongolian Draw. So, does anybody know why my shots tend to go to the right and how to correct this problem? I'd really appreciate your help. Thanks!
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Hello, I am Joan from barcelona 21 years old and I begin with kyudo last year. I work with computers and next year wanna star university. would like to meet people who practice kyudo to share experinces and others...

So thats me, Joan.
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Hello to everyone within the Kyudou community. I am new to this group and LiveJournal as a whole. I signed up today. I am fairly new to all this but I hope to post tons in this group. I also have a flickr account with some kyudo pictures in america. Check out my userid or keyword kyudo and america. I have been practicing kyudo in america for about 9 years now.
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Has anyone read the new book by John Stevens out called "Zen Bow, Zen Arrow", an account of the life and teachings of Awa Kenzo, The Archery Master from "Zen in the Art of Archery"?
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I was wondering if anyone here knows where to get a nice fiberglass boxw that isnt to expensive. I have been searching and they seem to run in the 400-600 dollar range. Since I would be using it for practice, does anyone know where I could get something cheaper than that?
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Just in case some of you don't know this yet: there are several kyudo/kyujutsu videos on YouTube, they're short but better than nothing at all. Just type "kyudo", "kyujutsu", "japanese archery", "yabusame", etc, in the search field.

My personal favorites are this one and this one (I have a weakness for yabusame).
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One of the most important things needed in kyudo practice is to achieve the state called "no-mind". In Daisetz T.Suzuki's book "Zen and Japanese Culture" this state is explained in the chapter devoted to swordsmanship. Despite the fact that the author only briefly mentions archery, his explanation of zen's role in swordsmanship is valid for kyudo as well, and for many other martial arts for that matter. So, here's an excerpt from this chapter:

Zen and SwordsmanshipCollapse )
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Hello, the name's Christina. 23 years old, female, lives in Tennessee. Now that I got the basics out of the way...

I've been going through the beginner steps of following the path of Shintoism, and even before then I've always wanted to learn Kyudo as a means of meditation. Unfortunately, living in Tennessee, there are no teachers where I live, so I'm going to have to wait until I can afford to move to Georgia (for college) in order to even begin my training. Still, I'd like to learn about it as much as I can from here and any resources I can get my hands on.

Thank you for having me.
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Happy New Year, everybody!
May the new year bring you at least one thing that you wish for.

Anyway... I suck at wishing things so I just wanted to say Happy New Year.
And sorry for not updating, the last two months were pretty busy for me but I promise there will be updates soon and hopefully they will be useful.

And again...

Happy New Year!!
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It has been a while since I last posted here. So sorry for my negligence. I came across something which may be of casual interest to the community. Yes, I swear that this post eventually has to do with Kyudo.

I was reading the other day a fascinating book on the interpretation of Fairy Tails by the Jungian Psychologist Marie-Louise von Franz (personal hero of mine). She was talking about a motif in a fairy tale where a girl, to prove herself worthy for marriage, jumps through a hoop. Dr. von Franz was speaking of the circle (in this case a golden hoop) as one of the symbols of the Self and the relevance of aiming for the centre, when I came upon this passage:

"Though it seems rather remote, a connection can also be made with the Zen Buddhist art of archery, where the idea is to aim at the center, not in the extraverted way that Westerners would do it, by physical skill and conscious concentration, but by a form of deep meditation by which the archer puts himself inwardly into his own center (what we* would call the Self), from whence, naturally, he can hit the outer target. Thus, in their highest performances, with their eyes shut and without aiming, Zen Buddhist archers can effortlessly hit the target. The whole practice is meant as a technical help to find the way to dwell in one's own inner center without being diverted by thoughts and ambitions and ego impulses."

-Marie-Louise von Franz, The Interpretation of Fairy Tales. copyright 1996, page 92

*= In this case "we" refers to Jungian Analysts

Just thought that some of you might find this passage of interest.
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Sorry that my first post is not at all useful per se; but none the less here is a colour bar I made. ^^

Colour bar and code under the cutCollapse )
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Click here to read about types of arrows, including: war arrows, arrows for target and competitive shooting, hunting and sports arrows, special typesCollapse )
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Click hear to read about arrows history and construction, including: the shaft, nocks, wrappings, feathers, haya & otoya, arrowheads, signature, care & storageCollapse )

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from of the chapter "CONTROL AND POWER: Kyujutsu":

In this traditional specialization of bujutsu, the following qualities were considered of fundamental importance by the teachers of the art: independence of vision, embracing as vast a field as possible; a keen perception of significant detail, without dispersion of attention due to fear or confusion; and power – power to draw back the huge bow, to control the release of the arrow and its trajectory toward the target. Regarding the first two requisites, kyujutsu doctrine made a clear distinction between the idea of aiming at a target (monomi) and that of concentrating and stabilizing the sight (mikomi); in the lexicon of this art, concentrating and stabilizing were general and diffused, while aiming was specific. The archer had to be able to enlarge or to narrow his field of vision and attention at will, in order to be aware of and able to control his environment as a whole. At the same time, he had to be capable of perceiving a particular shadow lurking in his vicinity, or even a single small chink in the armor of a galloping foe charging toward his lines on the battlefield. In this context, the art of archery availed itself of doctrines concerning mental control which were already ancient when they reached Japan from India together with the first manuals on Buddhism. The Japanese knew by heart the story of Arjuna the archer, for example. Invited to a tournament in which skill in archery was tested by having the archers aim at the eye of a painted wooden fish set high on a pole, many contestants were asked by a teacher, before they released their arrows, what it was they saw. With one exception, they all answered, "a fish." Arjuna replied that he saw only the "eye" of the fish, and, as might be expected, he alone hit the target. In order to develop this capacity to see clearly the whole and all its parts, kyujutsu made abundant use of haragei, "this art of the belly that runs through all the arts of Japan and whose mastery is a sine qua non in every one of them" (William R.B.Acker "Japanese Archery". Tokyo: Charles E.Tuttle Co., 1965).

Click here to continueCollapse )
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continuation of the chapter "THE MAJOR MARTIAL ARTS: The Art of Archery":

The fifteenth and sixteenth centuries saw the employment of archers on a larger, more democratic scale, that is, as compact units composed of archers who maintained a steady stream of arrows by shooting alternately, row upon row, while advancing relentlessly toward the enemy. Many a hero had, in fact, fallen under just such a cloud of arrows when he had outdistanced his troops while launching himself against the Mongol hordes. The wiser bushi moved in to challenge his peers on the opposite side only after his archers had weakened the strong line of enemy archers, thus increasing his chances of presenting his challenge at a reasonable distance. As indicated earlier, the advent of firearms and their employment on a general scale greatly reduced the strategic relevance of the bow and arrow on the battlefield, but left intact (often even magnified) their significance as national heirlooms.

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as i'm more interested in the engineering than the history, would anyone here know the proportions for ya? i'd also like to know what anyone can give me concerning materials, etc. things like construction i'm already familiar with(from fletching in general) but notes on balancing are welcome, but uneccesary.
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continuation of the chapter "THE MAJOR MARTIAL ARTS: The Art of Archery":

Japanese archery, as a science and as an art, was used in war, in ritualistic ceremonies, for sport, and (at its highest level) as a discipline of coordinated integration. In the first dimension, for the bushi, " 'war' and 'bow and arrow' (yumi-ya) [were] synonyms. Men spoke of Hachiman, the God of Battles, as yumi-ya no hachiman; the left hand received the name of yunde (yumi-no te or bow-hand), by which it is still commonly designated and the general term for 'soldier' was 'bow-holder' " (Captain F.Brinkley "Japan, 9 vols." Boston: J.B.Millet Co., 1902). On the battlefield, archery was employed primarily from horseback or on foot, when rows of archers would be used. As noted earlier, the former was generally considered the more ancient method, belonging to the epic days of those heroes who, according to Japanese legends, shaped the early history of the country. It was also considered to be intrinsically more aristocratic and individualistic in nature; in fact, if the arrows of the knight on horseback only wounded an enemy, such a warrior would not usually bother to administer the coup de grace himself (unless his foe was of equally high rank). In most cases, his foot soldiers would attend to such details.

Click here to continueCollapse )
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Kyudo.com
The name says it all. It's a rich resource, the most important part of which is the links to "U.S. organizations, instructors and events operating under the auspices of the International Kyudo Federation (IKYF) and the All Nippon Kyudo Federation (ANKF)"

Oko Kyudokai
The European Kyudo organisation of Zenko International founded by Kyudo Master Kanjuro Shibata XX.

London Kyudo Society
"The London Kyudo Society is a private voluntary body established to promote the practice of Kyudo - the traditional art of the Japanese bow. It is open to all who have an interest in Japanese traditional culture and in a practical way wish to take on the challenge and demands that Kyudo has to offer."

Kyudo Renmei Netherlands
The official website of the Kyudo Renmei Nederland (both in English and Dutch)

All Nippon Kyudo Federation
The official ANKF site (in Japanese)

Takeda School Kyubadou Yabusame
A kyubadou ("the way of the mounted archery") Japanese site (the great one, IMHO) (both in English and Japanese)

FFKT - Fédération de Kyudo Traditionnel
French Federation of Kyudo. It has the links to French kyudo organizations and dojo, as well as general information on kyudo (in French)

Kiel's Kyudojo
A German kyudo webside (in German)

Kyudo Club Torino
An Italian kyudo club (in Italian)

Kyudo web site
A Polish kyudo website (in Polish)

弓道活劇 with Flash
A fun site with flash-movies dedicated to kyudo practice (in Japanese)

"My experience of Kyudo in Japan"
A personal webpage of Bob Ridge with the sharing of his kyudo experience in Japan.

The Kyudo Project Incorporated
As site it says, "A California 501.3 (c) non-profit corporation dedicated to spreading timely and accurate information about Kyudo". It has a lot of links and articles, mostly useful, but some doubtful (although, it's for you to judge), but worth visiting.

...more links to be added...
don't hesitate to suggest other resources in the comments to this post
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Asahi Kyudo Shop
It's the first online shop that comes in my mind, obviously. So far it's the biggest online kyudo shop I've ever seen. It has the wide choice of yumi (both fiberglass and carbon) and there's a possibility to buy a bamboo yumi. And this shop has great assortment of arrows, strings, clothes and other essential things for kyudo practice.Sambu Kyuguten
An excellent supplier, situated in Japan and shipping worldwide. Quoting feochadn: "they ship incredibly quickly and Carly will answer any and all questions promptly".Tozando Kyudo Shop
Even though it sells only two yumi right now (and they're not even bamboo-made) and doesn't have a lot of other things to propose, it still is Japanese shop, available for everybody. And Tozando has actually the whole web of different online shops (the links can be found on the site), including iaido shop and bokken shop. I myself bought 2 bokkens from their bokken shop and must say they're of great quality. But mind you, as this shop is located in Japan and they mostly ship by EMS, the shipment cost might be expensive, depending on your location.
So far I haven't found any other kyudo-oriented online shops. But the large archery shops have sometimes some kyudo equipment:

Bowsports Traditional Bows
Bowsports has only one kyudo bow (listed in Traditional Bows) so far.Archery World Mongolian & Far East BowsAgain, not much of a choice, but it has an interesting catalogue of Asian bows (one of them is yumi)

If anyone knows any other links to kyudo suppliers, don't hesitate and post your sources in the comments.
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true to my word in the 'pimp my community' post, some research things.

http://eclay.netwiz.net/translat/kyudo.htm an interesting article on why the japanese bow are not symmetrical. the moste interesting part: it argues that the design is not because of mounted archery!

http://www.kyudo.com this might already by used in this community, or known at least. fascinating site on techniques.

i'll keep digging throughout the interweb, to see what other information i can sniff out. my goal, ultimatly, is to provide information on the construction of a yumi, so that those who have the time, patience, and desire, my shoot the authentic bows.
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Hello everybody. First of all I want to thank all of you for joining this community and give you all a big warm welcome. I know I invited all of you individually but I also decided to promote this place in other communities. I think that more members we have here, more experience and knowledge can be shared and more questions can be answered (like the one of shiroken who asked this question and unfortunately didn't get the informed answers (which, by the way, I think is due to the fact that bamboo yumi are very expensive and even experienced kyudoka might use only fiberglass bows because it's much less expensive and less fragile and "capricious" to extreme weather)).

So far I posted in the archery community, which seemed an obvious first choice to me. If any of you have ideas of other communities with members who might get interested in joining our community – please post your suggestions. Also, if you have friends who are interested in Japanese archery – please invite them.

Respectfully,
Y Llwynog.
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continuation of the chapter "THE MAJOR MARTIAL ARTS: The Art of Archery":

Even when warfare evolved from clashes between clans into full-scale battles between major armies, foot soldiers still were called upon to release the concentrated power of their volleys of arrows against opposing forces. Moreover, because of the excellence of theor art, archers were assigned a position of privilege among the combined troops, a position which they retained long after the fifteenth century, when the strategic importance of the bow and arrow on the battlefield had declined substantially. Even as recently as the eighteenth century, "etiquette ordered that the archers should be placed at the left, the musketeers at the right, and the battle was formally opened by a shower of arrows" (Eliza Skidmore "The Japanese Yano-ne" from "Transactions and Proceedings of the Japan Society, vol.6". London: 1901-04). Gilbertson thought tha this art, like so many others, probably came to Japan from China:

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I wonder if anybody knows if the bow was specifically associated with any Buddhist sects? Such as the naginata was associated with the Sohei. And yes, I am aware that the Sohei also used the bow on occasion.

What are the mythological/religious associations of the bow (in Japan, of course)?